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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
at some of the people to solve the leadership deficit, chris christie, marco rubio, we have a cast of characters for the 2016 race that's different than the cast of characters in the 2012 race, so i think there's a little silver lining in that for republicans. >> let's listen to what jay carney had to say about the new republican report. >> the best way to increase support with the public for your party is to embrace policies to public supports. >> howard fineman, jay carney makes sense every once in a while. >> and he did right there. and this report from rnc read like a soviet five-year plan. we will have more production and we are going to reach out to the ethnic minorities that we don't understand. it had very little relationship to reality, except there was a distant sound of their realization that for example on gay rights, they're way, way wrong. hillary clinton today came out in favor of supporting gay marriage. young people in the rnc's own report, young people are the ones leading the way on that. i'll give reince priebus credit for saying in that report that the issue of
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
that the republicans are a little bit too root canal, a little bit too debt-obsessed, a little bit too deficit-obsessed and don't talk about the economy and jobs, which polls still show are the number-one issue. >> yeah, they've got to go back to reagan and jack kemp to stop acting like consequence at this pated accountants and get focused on what makes this economy grow. and the way you get revenues, not by raising taxes, by growth. if we had normal growth rates, we would get another 4 or 500 billion right off the bat. that's what they should focus on. all a means to an end. on social security, stop coming across that you're going to, you know, do something to grandma and instead talk about the idea, which they haven't, they don't touch it, of having accounts for young people with proper controls where they own the fruits of their labor, not washington politicians. make it positive instead of this -- as you say, root canal, that was more graphic. >> i think that -- i don't want to get -- i want to talk about the corporate tax, but i want to add to this, i think in a sense obama was right. and
, the average 8.35. that now puts us in a deficit for the calendar year at 6.88. so one of the driest calendar years on record in the bay area. let's get you outside to the live sky network. many of you will get less in san jose, a few raindrops will help the allergies and air quality. foster city, you can see pointed toward the coastline some of those shower cells we tracked offshore. that will eventually move in for you. and in san francisco we've had a little bit of drizzle off and on at the immediate coastline. eventually, yes, we'll get that rainfall here as well. let's get a look at tpattern. this area of low circulation is out in the pacific, associated cold front. the main thing driving all of this moisture right now is this subtropical push of moisture. this would normally produce 1 to 3 inches of rainfall, but it's lacking some of the upper level dynamics we mentioned yesterday so, yes, we're going to have a decent round of some rain, but it's not going to be the strongest storm of 2013. throughout the night, we'll get showers we tracked offshore moving across the bay area. by 11:00
is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets here are a little lower, not all that much, though, given what we've had in headline risk this morning. dow jones industrial is down 38 points and s&p is off about 9. bob pisani is here to tell us what is going on. there's a lot of headline risk in the market today. >> and we're back moving on europe now. >> exactly. given 38 to the downside is not that bad. >> even europe is not reacting that much. let me show you the euro. everyone goes crazy talking about the euro. perhaps the finance minister may be resigning, we're trying to confirm that for sure. that's what we've been hearing. and on words that the governing b
are than really. >> congressman, turning to another budget balancing deficit reducing measure, we've had lots of talk over the years in the potential grand bargain. we have never seen anything come to fruition. but what i want to know from you is what you would actually want to see in a grand bargain. and if we even need a grand bargain at this point since the peak in 2009, deficit is coming down. there is a new report out from president's council of economic advisors saying if we are able to hold medicare to growth rate over the past five years, it has actually been doing well and would go a long way to closing the budget gap. what are you looking for? do we even need a grand barring on right now? >> can couple of things. number one, i think it would be better if we had a grand bargain but i'm skeptical we would have one. give we give away money, about $1.2 trillion. everyone knows the tax code is a mess. economically inefficient. stacked off in times against the middle class. so if we can clean up the tax code that would be beneficial. second, healthcare issue is a very serious one. me
of the federal deficit should be the top priority for congress this year. 52% say immigration reform is a top issue. 42% say new gun control policies are the most important issues. and 33% say efforts to combat climate change should be the priority. >> 7:08. we know what sal's priority is keeping a close eye on traffic. >> okay. right now we are looking at a community much better than it was yesterday. we have slow downs obviously. let's take a look at the bay bridge. earlier minor crash. didn't last for too long. but the metering lights were turned on and slowed down for a bit. so it's a little worse than it normally is. backed up to the mc arthur maze. 30-35 minute delay. if there are no other problems on the bridge, this will begin to wind out and by 8:00 see an improvement. this morning's commute has been busy on 880 between hayward and fremont. we're talking about the livermore valley as well. westbound 580 slowing coming in over the pass. but no problems into castro valley. let's go to steve. >> thank you. mostly clear. patchy low clouds. they are going north to south. they'll eventuall
we go deficit reduction. you saw minutes 6-3. there was expectation we had noises out from tucker that perhaps there might have been a bigger number voting for qe. what we will look at today is to see what osbourne does with the bank of england and there's a bunch of things he might do from amending the target, inflation target to changing the bank of england act saying we'll put in a jewel mandate. that may be more of a focus than anything he says about borrowing figures and growth numbers. >> absolutely. you can look at the sterling reaction here, ross. we're spiking above 151 now on the back of those minutes. melanie, over to you. i guess investors would have liked to see hints of a more accommodative bank of england here during the last meeting. might there not be more of a policy shift under way perhaps as ross said related to even changing the mandate? >> in terms of what we're expecting today, we do think that it might be the more interesting of the budget to watch. i wouldn't expect any big changes today. i think what he may do is announce a review of the policy fra framew
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
of cutting something else we have a trillion dollar deficit. neil: you know, every time the president or something else goes on a foreign trip, i immediately hang to my wallet. they open the wallet left and right to the foreign governments, i'm thinking, that is not good. >> last week, we signed a contract state department, giving usaid 25 million to crime frightennishtivefight inivetives in el salvador. foreign trade is a much better way to get there. but this shows that spending that steve is talking about happens every day, no one cares, very few people write about itic semp cranks like us, and maybe you should step back, take a breath and cut something. neil: the foreign aid budget, is you know, if you count it about 20 billion a year. that is a lot of money to be giving away from american taxpayers to give to foreign country, and show me any example where foreign aid has worked to make a country richer. i said, it gives money from poor people, and rich people, and gives to to rich people in poor countries that is what foreign aid is. neil: thank you very much. >> thank you. neil:
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
exaggerated by looking at year to date, a boon. the boon right now, at a 56 basis point deficit to the treasuries. that's a wide spread. and the last two-day chart of the euro versus the dollar. should it break through 1.28.80, it could challenge the current four-month lows versus the greenback. sue, back to you. >> rick, thank you very much. >>> some new clues about the state of the job market today. the number of americans filing unemployment benefits rising slightly last week to 336,000. a tad below estimates. we've seen a number of job cuts announced recently. so is the labor market running out of steam? listen to what "mad money's" jim cramer said earlier today. >> tens of thousands of people are going to be laid off within the next month. >> whatever little. >> and that's going to show up in the numbers, in that 330,000 employment, that may be the last good one. bernanke is not smoking dope, pot, whatever they call it now. >> well, is he right? joining us now is "the wall street journal's" chief economics correspondent john hillsenrath. good to see you. >> good to be here.
the deficit, creates jobs, ensures global peace and security. t fights a good fight often without a lot of recognition but just doing a good job. not speaking today on behalf congressional black caucus. we have to hold any president ccountable in terms of checks and balances. that is part of the three ranches of government, udiciary, executive and legislati legislative. we have a duty and ensure that y to people have a voice in their guest: let government. what the house of representatives is about. written to president obama and respectfully have sked him to really justify and give us the information about the asis upon which -- legal basis -- the use of drones is engaged in as a result of efforts. we are waiting for the response from them on that. think it is important we ask any president questions as members of congress, it is our responsibility to do that and to personally continue to do that. i think that it president has image changed america's and role in the world and is phenomenal job. but that doesn't mean i won't exercise my duties and rights as ask the of congress to hard q
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
a surplus of politics and deficit of intelligence when it comes to this. germans and fins and a number of others feel they have to tell very uninformed electorate that they are being tough. we have to extract some blood. they don't understand that this is a two pointed sword. by trying to extract blood from greeks sand cypriots they are inflicting enormous pain. $500 billion worth of capitalization around the world wiped out. >> as moronic as this plan was, we've heard there are not a lot of options. >> there are options. >> first of all, they should be putting in place the equivalent of the fdic. when we close a failed bank in the united states, we go in on a friday with fdic and occ. it's all hush hush. you close the bank. you move the depositors money into a good bank and you don't lose faith in the banking system. >> don't they need 27 countries to put that in their charter? >> this is what europe was moving toward. this is what was recognized this past summer and this is why -- >> we knew it would take time. >> this throws that out the window and the thing is that they're not sayi
deficit. we're spending a trillion more than we take in every year. everything has to be on the table. one thing i would suggest is that there are tipping points to everything. in the middle class segment people between $100,000 to $250,000 in home purchase price, mortgage interest makes sense to the middle class borrowers. and the question is do they count that when they look to buy a home versus rent. people stopping buying altogether. if it has an impact, how does that impact construction? has to be on the table. it has to be something we take in context with the broader picture. >> help us get rid of freddie and fannie some day too. put something together for me, will you? >> keep in mind, while we sit around and vilify freddie and fannie. >> see you love them. that's a shock. >> i don't. i think we ought to go away from them. but we need liquidity to ensure there's capital. >> can't do it now. especially now. all right. great hair. good looking man. and you watch, unlike some other people that work here. anyway, thanks, dave. >> you may not watch for a few minutes when you walk to get
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)